Weekly Roundup

Weekend Roundup – 14/04/18

I know I said that I’d have exciting things to say given that I actually had some time off this week. What I did instead was sleep. A lot. I been catching around ten, eleven hours a night. I was the gym every day, I wrote a little and watched some fun films and some homework films and played more video games than I’ve had the chance to in a while. I cut real loose.

Film · Review

A Quiet Place Review – Subdued thrills

People online be getting all sniffy. ‘I wanna watch A Quiet PlaceĀ in cinemas,’ they say, ‘but teens and phones and I can’t trust them to be quiet when the film’s on. So I won’t.’ Ah, suck it up, stop being so precious and go see the goddamn movie. It’s pretty good. For what it’s worth I caught an evening screening, opening weekend, fairly full with a younger audience and everyone in our theatre were locked in from the start. Once the film make it clear what it’s doing you’ve not really any choice, it’s get in or get out.

Film · Review

Ghost Stories Review – Worse than the sum of its parts

Ghost Stories as a movie finds itself in a sticky predicament. The play, also written and directed by Jeremy Dyson & Andy Nyman is presented as an investigation, partly this paranormal investigator looking over the most mysterious cases of his life, but also an investigation into horror tropes. It’s particularly concerning older horror flicks I guess, those from the sixties and seventies, the B movies and the things that calcified into tropes over that period say about us as a people.

Film · Queer Filmmakers · Review

Love, Simon Review – Queering the image

Young queer lives can be so fuckin messy. You often only realise it later. You remember that loose mix of outcast kids that were about at school? The goths, nerds, emos and just general weirdos who generally just hung out with each other because they didn’t make up a large enough group in thei own circles. Yeah, that was me. You’d be surprised, or not, by how many of us has came out after leaving. As if our fragile presence was both supporting and constricting.

Film · Review

Pacific Rim: Uprising Review – Big shoes to fill

You know what? The robots in this film are BIG. I don’t quite know what it is, they certainly aren’t better realised or animated than megastructures in other films. I weren’t even watching it in 3D, lol who even does that anymore, but however it is that you generate that elusive concept of bigness, Steven S. DeKnight pumps that through every frame. Like, the ‘exterior’ scenes are often pretty wonky, the lighting is off, the characters awkwardly composited onto the backgrounds. But way off in the back there there’s a big metal fella out of focus and despite the artifice there’s a little part of my brain still going, ‘Wow, so big tho.’